(Thanks for a great day! Video of the event is here and follow-up actions are listed here.)

Join Bill McKibben and 350 Seattle, in conjunction with 350's National Day of Action:

Two years ago, retired NASA climatologist James Hansen famously stated that if we allowed the development of Keystone XL, it would be "game over" for the climate.

After a vast effort, it’s possible that that’s a fight we’re about to win, even though everyone said at the time that KXL was a done deal. But we can't let up: KXL is still on the table, and the fossil fuel companies, desperate to mine and sell all they can before we come to our senses, have planned coal trains, shale oil terminals, and additional pipelines and tankers, in Washington and Oregon alone,  that together would transport oil, gas, and coal, the combustion of which would emit nearly three times the carbon pollution of KXL. If KXL would be "game over", what would this be?

It’s not too late to make a difference: a recent study found that "acting quickly to mitigate climate change could reduce [biodiversity] losses by 60 per cent and buy an additional 40 years for species to adapt." We think that’s a difference worth fighting for.

Here in the Pacific Northwest, we're uniquely positioned to have an impact on fossil fuel use worldwide: we stand in solidarity with frontline communities scarred by extreme energy extraction, and communities already suffering the devastations of climate change, by challenging the fossil fuel companies to keep it in the ground. Join us to draw the line and say No! to risking the health of Puget Sound, the Northwest, and the planet with a flood of fossil fuel on its way to Asia. Burned here or burned there, we all feel the heat.

What: From 11-12:45, we'll have workshops (in two sessions) on topics including: an overview of all of the infrastructure projects currently on the table in the Northwest, tar sands in Washington State, the TPP, the current status of the coal train proposals, ocean acidification, a possible WA carbon tax, Nonviolent Direct Action, and Plant for the Planet. There will be kids' art-making and Plant for the Planet tents in both sessions; the whole event is family friendly. Following workshops, we'll have our keynote speakers, including 350.org founder Bill McKibben, introduced by Mayor Mike McGinn; Hereditary Chief Phil Lane Jr., member of the Yankton Sioux & Chickasaw Nations, and the Four Worlds International Institute Chairman; Sundance Chief Rueben George of the Tsleil-Waututh First Nation in B.C.; Friends of the Earth president Erich Pica; and 350 Seattle coordinator Lynn Fitz-Hugh and her daughter Sara Grendon.

Listen to this morning's great interview of Bill with Bellamy Pailthorp on KPLU.

Bring: any BRIGHT RED FABRIC (scarves, shirts, fabric 2 feet or more in length by 8 inches or more in width). We'll be encouraging people to hold these up to show where they're willing to do the work to help us all "Draw the Line", and after the speakers are done, we'll stand in a line for a group photo, between the tracks and the water, and hold up our red fabric - drawing a clear red line together - saying no to fossil fuel exports. We'll have some available for those without, but we're hoping for thousands of people, and we couldn't find that many used red sheets (not for lack of trying!).

The Facebook event page is here.

The Seattle Parks Department has come through heroically, and is letting us bring in the portolet trucks, so earlier warnings can now be ignored.

When: Sept. 21, 11am-2pm

Where: Myrtle Edwards Park on the downtown waterfront (just north of the Sculpture Park: our main gathering area will be just below the Thomas St. pedestrian walkway). Parking is difficult in this area (you can try parking on lower Queen Anne and coming over the walkway, or parking at the north end of Centennial park and walking south to Myrtle Edwards)--please try to take the bus! Myrtle Edwards is a little tricky to get into (whether via the Sculpture Park, Centennial Park, or the walkway), so leave a little extra time to figure it out if you haven't been there before. Again,

  • There's almost no parking; bus is best (trip planner here).
  • We'll be gathered at the base of the Thomas St. pedestrian walkway...despite its name, the entrance is actually on 3rd Ave West (ramp) or Western Ave. (stairs).
  • By bike or by foot, you can also get into the park from the Sculpture Park side to the south; just walk north along the path next to the water, and you'll soon see us, but it's nearly a half-mile.
We hope to have water available, but please bring a water bottle if you can!

...and again, please Bring: any BRIGHT RED FABRIC (scarves, shirts, fabric 2 feet or more in length by 8 inches or more in width). We'll be encouraging people to hold these up to show where they're willing to do the work to help us all "Draw the Line", and after the speakers are done, we'll stand in a line for a group photo, between the tracks and the water, and hold up our red fabric - drawing a clear red line together - saying no to fossil fuel exports. We'll have some available for those without, but we're hoping for thousands of people, and we couldn't find that many used red sheets (not for lack of trying!).

Who: You, and everyone you know who cares about preserving a vibrant world.

Endorsed by: the Sierra Club, Plant for the Planet, iMatter, Rising Tide Seattle, Earth Ministry, Washington Interfaith Power and Light, the Backbone Campaign, 2013 Compassion Games, Puget Soundkeeper, Central Co-op, Climate Solutions, Friends of the Earth, and PSARA.